Friday, May 15, 2015

Airtime for the Liturgy of the Hours

I just noticed an article about the Liturgy of the Hours in the latest print edition of the National Catholic Register.  I hope that link will open for non-suscribers. Let me know.  

Next,  I found something even better: this podcast of the latest Register Radio program, in which the author of the article, Celeste Behe, talks with Register director Dan Burke all about our favorite scriptural prayer.

Both Dan and Celeste make many good points about the impact of liturgical prayer in their lives, and it's significance in our troubled times.  They bring up several instances of Catholic workplaces where the staff pray one or more of the hours together each day, and the positive effect that this has had on interpersonal relations.

They also plug my book several times during the discussion, and I am grateful for that.

This part of the podcast starts at around 14:20, in case you don't have time to listen to the earlier guest during the first half of the podcast.

As always, please feel free to make any comment or ask any question related to the Liturgy of the Hours in the comment section below.

13 comments:

  1. The link only opened the home page for me (non-subscriber).

    I have a question:
    Do you, or any of the readers, have experience with chanting the Office recto-tono? I think that's the right term. Just chanting in a single tone. Does the last syllable/word get lengthened or do you chant it like you would in normal speech?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Good question, Ed. We did the office in recto tono at my husband's workplace many years ago (I was there as a volunteer). Just like with regular (melodic) chanting, there is a slight lengthening and slight pause (as you would to take a breath when you sing.) Recto tono is a good way to start chanting, but if after a while you find it monotonous, the next step is to go up a single note higher on the end of the first line, and then a single note lower on the end of the next line. And if you have one of those three-line strophes (with the dagger/cross mark) you treat the first two lines of it as if they were the first line of a two-line section. (I hope that makes sense, if not don't worry about it and enjoy your recto tono chant.

    ReplyDelete
  3. That does make sense. I might try the recto tono chant for Evening Prayer tonight, I'm lucky if the voice holds out to just speak in a quiet volume in the morning. It'll be interesting to see if one note can be held, then hopefully after that, the way you suggested can be tried.
    Thanks for your help!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi Daria!

    This is Wencie from the Philippines. Recently bought your book; loved your insights and information. Really helped in further understading the LOTH.

    Been using app on LOTH, a few months back. Been playing in my car enroute to work. But felt awkward pulling out my smartphone while at church while attending Holy Mass combined with Morning/Evening prayers. So bought my 4-volume LOTH and the Christian Prayer. Used bought, but more of the former when I do the Office of Readings.
    (I intend to buy the vernacular version to get a feel of the prayers in filipino. Suprisingly, it becomes a hobby to collect LOTH versions.)

    Have 2 questions:

    (1) Will there be a new version of the breviaries soon? (Or, are we waiting for the revised psalter by the Benedictine Monks?)
    (2) Quite concerned about the Concluding Prayer. App and breviaries are not the same. Which is more official? (Or, like the hymns, it's ones preference on which one to pick?)

    Hopefully, I can contaminate my family/friends with this beautiful ancient tradition.

    Thanks for your help. God bless you too in spreading this holy tradition.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wencie, I"m sorry I did not respond sooner--I somehow missed this comment. It does indeed become a hobby to buy different versions of the LOTH. I really don't know when the new English (American) breviary will be available, but I don't think it will be any time soon. Several more years at the very least. The concluding prayer gives both the prayer that is currently in your breviary, as well as the newer translation which is already in the mass (the opening prayer or collect of each day's mass is also approved for the LOTH). It is your preference which one to use. I tend to choose the second prayer, which is the newer translation, since it usually is theologically more profound.

      Delete
    2. Thanks for the response, Daria.

      Is there a link where to find the concluding prayers (new translation from the mass) that I can refer to?

      Delete
    3. I also use the 2nd translation of the Collect on the iBreviary app. So much better than the terrible 70s ISEL translation. I pray it will be a foretaste of the new Breviary -- if I live long enough to have it. I use now the Kenyan translation of the Breviary, published 2009, which has the superior New Grail Psalter. The I use iBreviary for the Collect. The Kenyan Bishops got tired of waiting for the new ISEL Breviary. Good for them!

      Delete
  5. This Sunday, the Easter season ends with the conclusion of second Vespers. So for Compline that night, which Marian antiphon should be sung, the Regina Coeli, or Salve Regina for ordinary time? Also, I'm using the book "The Office of Compline". Should I use the hymn for Pentecost, or a different one, like for Sundays and Memorials of the year?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, that's a good question, and I don't know if there is a definitive answer out there. Even though, as you say, the season ends with second vespers, we still say Sunday II Comipline, and it is still Pentecost Sunday, isn't it? So I would still do the Regina Coeli one last time, and go back to Salve Regina on Monday night. In the pre-Vatican II liturgical year there was an octave of Pentecost, so you would still continue with the Regina Coeli til the following Saturday night. (This is just a point of trivia which doesn't shed light on your question! :) Anyway, it does seem that even if Easter "officially" ends with second vespers, there is still a faint Paschal echo that continues thru Compline, so I"ll do the Regina Coeli. But I can't find anything in documents that really pins this down.

      Delete
    2. I think that the Regina Coeli is still continued throughout the week following Pentecost, ending with Noon of the Saturday. This, and the allowance of the rest of this week as the time in which to make our "Easter duty" is all that's left of the Pentecost Octave. The general instruction for the LotH specifies only that the Regina Coeli be used after Compline in Eastertide, with the other antiphons used ad libitum. Given that, letting the traditional schedule guide our use seems reasonable. Within the Anglican Use/Ordinariate, we continue the Regina Coeli up through Saturday.

      Delete
  6. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hi Daria, as we are on the eve of the Feast of the Blessed Trinity, I belive the TRISAGION should be included in the Divine Office. I was wondering if you could give us some guidance on this please

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Not sure how much guidance I could give. We can always add the Trisagion to our office as a devotional "extra". And there's this: the hymn "Sing Praise to Our Creator" appears as the hymn for the Office of Readings on Trinity Sunday. The refrain more or less contains Trisagion, although replacing "have mercy on us" with "be adored." Furthermore, the third antiphon for second vespers is reminiscent of the Trisagion. That's about the best we can do. I'd have no idea whom to "lobby" for an official change.

      Delete