Divine Office talks and workshops

...for your Catholic gathering, conference, day of recollection, or retreat.

I am now available to speak and give workshops on the Liturgy of the Hours. Here's my formal pitch.


Author/journalist/blogger available for  conferences
Sanctify the Hours of Your Day!
It's the best kept secret of the Church's spiritual treasury.
Nearly as old as the Church itself, the Liturgy of the Hours,
(also called the Divine Office), is a repeating cycle of psalms,
bible readings and prayers, synched to the feasts and seasons
of the liturgical year. The Liturgy of the Hours offers us multiple
short, daily prayer-breaks to sanctify each phase of our
busy day,and to refresh our souls with the riches of scripture and tradition.
Pope Benedict said,
I would like to renew my call to everyone to pray the Psalms, to
become accustomed to the Liturgy of the Hours,Lauds, Vespers, and Compline.” (11/2011 Audience)
Surely this “everyone” includes the committed Catholic men and women who attend your
conference or event. For too long Catholics have felt intimidated by an outdated notion that the Divine Office was only for clergy and religious, or by the lack of clear instructions for praying the breviary. Online digital breviaries now make this prayer easy and available to everyone.
Veteran Catholic writer Daria Sockey has made the Office a part of her prayer life for many years, including the season of life when caring for a large, homeschooled family took up most of her day. Her blog, Coffee and Canticles, has been a source of information and inspiration for both newcomers and those who are experienced with the public prayer of the Church. And her book, The Everyday Catholic's Guide to the Liturgy of the Hours, has been a Catholic bestseller.  Daria's message would make an excellent addition to any conference where Catholics go to improve their prayer lives, knowledge of scripture, liturgy, or Catholic customs. Homeschooling mothers are always hungry for ways to integrate prayer into their busy day. Her basic talk explains what the Liturgy of the Hours is, why one should consider praying it, and resources for making it happen. She can also follow this talk up with a practical break-out session/workshop that gives the “how-to's” in detail. In addition, if your conference includes group prayer time in its schedule, Daria would be happy to lead morning or midday prayer as a way to introduce attendees to the Liturgy of the Hours.
814-354-2052



18 comments:

  1. The greatest conundrum for me is why do you guys in the US/Canada have one version (over four volumes) and us another (the three volume edition)- especially since all the new media seem to base their offering on the four-volume edition. Could the Holy See not help us now and declare one official version for the english-speaking church.

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    1. Back in the 80s, when I was still using a one-volume breviary, I had the UK version (Harper-Collins), and was pleased that they used a nicer Bible translation, had better hymns and didn't have those psalm prayers, which seem to be an American invention. But I left it behind when switched to the Pauline 1-volume which included daytime prayer. After that I moved up to the four-volume. I have heard that on flaw of the UK breviary is that the binding is of poor quality and falls apart easily. Don't know if this is true since I've never seen the 3-volume. I would love it if ibreviary would use the UK version. I'm also wondering which one is used in those African nations where English is the official language. I too,would love the HOly See to do for the breviary what they've done for the mass. But when you think how long that took to happen, there's not telling when they'll get around to the breviary.

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  2. Dear Daria, I recently read your article in "Catholic Digest" on summer fiction to read. I admire the variety of books you reviewed and plan to follow your advice!

    Today I'm writing b/c my spiritual memoir-entitled "Walking Home: Growing up Hispanic in Houston" will be published at the end of this month by Texas Review Press. I would love to have a review copy sent to you. Please contact me at cortez.sarah@gmail.com.
    Many thanks for all you do!
    Sarah Cortez

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  3. Daria, your book, "The Everyday Catholic's Guide to the Liturgy of the Hours" is terrific. I'm one who's tried and failed to pray the LOTH, but I'm back and with a new and informed approach, thanks to your book. I bought the Kindle version, and am now going to order a hard copy. Many, many thanks!

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    1. Hi Liz,
      Welcome to Coffee and Canticles. I'm glad you like the book. Feel free to ask questions at the weekly Q&A post if there is anything you want to know that was not clear in the book.

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  4. Daria
    Your blog is so helpful. Thank you for sharing so freely your experienced guidance.

    The posts "praying the Psalms" was especially helpful to me because you explained so clearly the different approaches to the angry psalms and the ones expressing such desolation. Because of your commentary on them, I'm now comfortable in praying with the body of Christ on earth, which is suffering, and the historical Christ in His suffering (both then and now).

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    1. That's great, Maryellen. Thanks for letting me know-I love positive feedback.

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  5. Would it be proper to do one of the Daytime LOTH one day and the Office of the Readings the next day.

    Jo Ann

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    1. Since all of this is voluntary, you may mix and match as you please. The Office of Readings in particular may be said any time of day.

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  6. Does your book contain instructions for all the day time prayers. Mid morning etc?

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    1. Yes. But if you read it and still are not clear on anything, you can always write me here and I'll answer anything.

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  7. I have just finished you wonderful book The Everyday Catholic Guide TO THE LITURGY OfThe HOURS_ it is so very good!!! Your book will be a great help in encouraging the laity to pray the Liturgy of the Hours. May god bless you and Mary love you.Thank you chuck little

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  8. Hi Daria. as a 'lapsed Catholic of many years, I never even considered praying the LOTH. When Francis was elected pope, I was pleased & surprised & felt a need to start attending mass again. So I did and I began attending RCIA classes in September. When someone mentioned praying LOTH I looked up resources about it on net & ended up ordering "The Everyday Catholic's Guide to the Liturgy of the Hours". It was so much help! I got the app for my NOOK and later got hard copy of 'Christian Prayer'....without you book I don't think I would have ever started praying LOTH...thanks so much! Lori

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    1. Wow! I am so thrilled to be part of your return to a deeper practice of the Catholic faith. Welcome home! I love Pope Francis (although I loved the other ones, too) and am so happy that he is having this effect on so many people. If you have any questions at all about the LOTH, just ask at the end of any post on the homepage. I usually do a weekly Q&A that is specific for that purpose, but really, people can comment anywhere.

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    2. PS I hope you don't mind, but I might use your comment in a future blog post.

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    3. I don't mind at all...I also have LOTH on my computer..I use all 3 depending on what fits best at any particular time. I must admit tho I prefer my nook for morning prayer because it's all right there without any flipping thru the book. But I am getting better using the book. Thanks again for your book!! Lori

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    4. Where did you get the app for your Nook? All I can find is one that needs the latest and greatest and I have a simple one. Thanks. Nancy

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