Sunday, July 23, 2017

Memorial of St. Sharbel Makhluf



If you use an American breviary, you won't find the optional memorial of St. Sharbel Makhul in your proper of saints. But it's tomorrow, July 24th.

This Maronite rite saint from Lebanon, who died in 1882, has gained quite a following in recent years, probably due to his reputation as a miracle worker.  There are a number of dramatic cures attributed to his intercession, including that of a blind woman in Arizona who venerated the saint's touring relics in 2016.

If you want to include St. Sharbel in your Office tommorrow, you would use the regular psalter for Monday week IV. If you wish, after the psalmody you could go to the Common of Pastors and use that from the reading onwards, but staying with the entire Monday psalter is fine, too.  Then, use  this concluding prayer, which you can find at ibreviary.com

O God, who called the Priest Saint Sharbel Makhlūf
to the solitary combat of the desert
and imbued him with all manner of devotion,
grant us, we pray,
that, being made imitators of the Lord’s Passion,
we may merit to be co-heirs of his Kingdom.
Who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
 Amen.

Now, those of you who use the Office of Readings are wondering if there is a second reading for St. Sharbel.   ibreviary does not have one. Universalis.com does  have one for him, a reading from St. Ignatius to the Magnesians.   Now this is curious, because my 2009 Pauline African breviary has a different reading, "from the letters of Amonius, hermit". I can't find it online, so I cannot copy and paste it here.  And my dedication to this cause does not extend to being willing to type out 800+ words here on the blog. Plus that may violate copyright. 

I understand that St. Sharbel even has devotees (and has answered prayers for) Muslims. So we might do well tomorrow to ask his intercession for the conversion of many more of them. 

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

College Student LOTH fan explains it all

Just wanted to share a lovely article by a college student at the Lifeteen website.  It's always wonderful to see anyone telling the world about the Liturgy of the Hours, but this is a particularly well done piece. The author gives a good, popular introduction intended to appeal to her peers, and to that end seasons the piece with goofy graphics.

Enjoy.