Sunday, January 17, 2016

Snowy Evenings and Disappearing Collects


Good evening, friends! Having just finished Evening Prayer,  I'm sitting here in my Divine Office rocking chair, in front of my picture window, gazing  past the birdfeeders and out into the snowy evening.  I love snowstorms when I get to watch them from inside a warm house, especially since  there's no need to drive anywhere for the rest of the day on this Day of Rest. 

I just found this question from a reader in the comments of an older post. I'll share and answer it here, since I bet this reader is not the only one who is puzzled. Here's the  question:


Daria,
I need an explanation.
Why does the MP Concluding Prayer in all three online breviaries no longer match the the Collect prayer from the day's Mass? 

I thought they were authorized by ecclesial authorities to match . . .and for some time they did as I recall. Now it seems that the online sites have returned to matching the MP Concluding Prayer with what is documented in the breviary books and NOT the new/revised Collect Prayer from the day's Mass as approved for use in the 2011 missal. What's going on?

And now the answer.  Yes, the concluding prayers are authorized to "match" the Collect of the day's mass, when, and only when, the collect and the concluding prayer of  the Liturgy of the Hours are supposed to be the same prayer. And they are not  the  same prayer during MP and EP in Ordinary  time.   Here are the relevant explanations from the good old General Instruction for  the Liturgy of the Hours: 


197. The concluding prayer at the end marks the completion of an entire hour...
198. In the office of readings, this prayer is as a rule the prayer proper to the day. At night prayer, the prayer is always the prayer given in the psalter for that hour.
199. The concluding prayer at morning prayer and evening prayer is taken from the proper on Sundays, on the weekdays of the seasons of Advent, Christmas, Lent, and Easter, and on solemnities, feasts, and memorials. On weekdays in Ordinary Time the prayer is the one given in the four-week psalter to express the character of these two hours.
200. The concluding prayer at daytime prayer is taken from the proper on Sundays, on the weekdays of the seasons of Advent, Christmas, Lent, and Easter, and on solemnities and feasts. On other days the prayers are those that express the character of the particular hour. These are given in the four-week psalter.

So, to sum up. The concluding prayer for Morning,  Evening, and Daytime prayer is identical to the Collect of the day's mass only during the various holy seasons, and also for any saint's day throughout the year. The concluding prayer for Office of Readings is that of the mass all year long.   Eventually, when the revised translation of the English breviary is complete, you will see a change (i.e. an  improved translation, similar to what we had for the Roman  missal) in the concluding prayers in the four week psalter as well. But that is a few years down the  road. 

11 comments:

  1. Thank you for that explanation.

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  2. After thinking about your response further, it seems to me that if one primarily prefers to use the breviary book (like I do), they should probably switch to the online LOTH sites during the holy seasons and saints' feasts, solemnities, etc so that they will be praying the Concluding Prayer that matches the Collect Prayer from the day's Mass because the Concluding Prayer in the breviary book will NOT match the Collect Prayer any longer due to the revised missal of 2011. Is that a correct understanding?

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  3. Well, I just looked at the Office of Readings, Concluding Prayer for today in the breviary book. And it does NOT match the Collect Prayer for this week in Ordinary Time, i.e. Sunday's Mass Collect. The prayer IS correct in the online versions though. Sooooo...I guess it is best to stick with praying the online LOTH versions if one wants to be correct at all times. Hrumph!

    I think I knew all of this at one time but I've forgotten. Too many martinis perhaps. LOL!

    Thanks for all you do, Daria.

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    1. When I said that the OOR concluding prayer in your book will match the collect of the mass, I meant that it matched in essence, not in translation. If you compare the two you will see that both ask God to hear our prayers and grant us peace. You can see the superiority of the new translation (the one used at mass.) So yes, if you are eager to have the best translation whenever possible, use an online version. Or do what I do when I want to enjoy my book (easier on the eyes, aesthetically more pleasing, etc.) I start out by opening the ibreviary of divineoffice.org app on my phone or Kindle, scrolling down to the concluding prayer, then sit back with my book to read the entire liturgical hour, turning my beloved paper pages. At t he end I reach over for the electronic device and read the prayer from it. Best of both worlds.

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  4. This past Saturday's MP (Vol III page 810) had a reading (2 Peter 1:10-11) and a prayer yet the St. Joseph's guide directs us to Vol III page 73 for the reading and prayer. If one wanted to learn to use the book without a guide how would one know to go to page 73 for the reading and prayer.

    To make it more confusing Universalis uses the short reading (2 Peter 1:10-11) but a completely different prayer from the guide or the book. I was unable to check Divine Office because it only goes back one day. Thank you.

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    1. Sounds like a misprint in the St. Joseph's Guide. Page 73 would be the prayer for the Office of Readings for that day, not Morning Prayer.

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    2. The St. Joseph guide can be relied on to be WRONG several times each year, which is why I urge people to wean themselves off of it. Just keep that parish calender you get at church every year--it will tell you what week in ordinary time it is in case you lose track. It also alerts you to saints days. The correct week in the 4 week psalter corresponds to the week in ordinary time thus: if it is a multiple of 4, you are on week IV in the psalter. If multiple of 4, +1 then you are on week I in the psalter. 4+2 and it's week 2, etc. If there's not saint's day, you just use the psalter, as you already know. It there is a saint and it's a memorial rather than a feast, just use the 4 week psalter and such elements as appear in the proper of saints for that feast. You don't have to switch out your psalms for those in the proper of (martyrs, holy women, whatever) unless the saint's day is a feast rather than a memorial. With these principles, you can find your way around in the breviary during ordinary time with no difficulty. Lent, of course, adds a new dimension but we aren't there yet!

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  5. The Monks of Norcia (those of the recent Gregorian Chant 'Benedicta' Billboard album chart topper) have an excellent calendar that they put out each year; it contains all of the new calendar and traditional calendar holy days, saint days, feasts, etc. Very thorough, details what week in ordinary time (or week after Epiphany / Pentecost, as you prefer) and is all you really need as far as a guide to what to celebrate or commemorate for the Church day. Plus fabulous monastic photos each month!

    http://osbnorcia.org/en/2016calendar

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  6. John Burzynski, TAN Books also issues three calendars every year and they list BOTH the new and traditional calendar events. I recommend them. I have purchased the Norcia Monks calendar, too. Same format.

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  7. Great post here on the recent changes as we prepare ourselves for the upcoming revisions of the Liturgy of the Hours. Over Christmas, I treated myself to the four volume Kenyan LOTH - to replace my aging pre-Catholic Book Publishing copy of Morning and Evening Prayer. This old edition had a misprint of a couple of sections, and it was corrected by inserting the right text on labels. So, that is what I have done for my new four-volume set...I copied the new collects from the Revised Roman Missal for Sundays, Solemnities, etc. and printed them on labels which I formatted to match the print in the books. I have now pasted all the collects in my book copy. It is handy for me. Took a bit of time, but not really that much - in all about two hours. I worked on it slowly when time permitted.

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    1. Great idea. I do something similar--our parish gives out the Word Among Us daily devotional magazine each month, which includes daily mass texts. I snip out the collect with scissors and glue it into my book. Havne't done it consistently, but maybe will have it all fixed by the time the new breviary is out.

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