Saturday, February 25, 2017

The Gaze of God Envelops Us

Friends, I am still struggling with trying to get back to regular blogging but that goal continues to elude me.

But you don't need my mediocre meditations when you have the words of St. Benedict with commentary from authentic Irish Benedictine monks.

So enjoy this piece and bring it's teaching to mind as you pray the Liturgy of the Hours today. 

11 comments:

  1. Thanks Daria, but unable to open the Link. Could you fix it pleaase

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    1. Eek! Sorry, can't fix from my phone but search for a blog called Cultus Christi and you'll find it.

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    2. http://vultuschristi.org/index.php/2017/02/of-reverence-at-prayer-2/

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  2. Oops, I think this the one Daria referring to:
    http://vultuschristi.org/index.php/2017/02/of-the-discipline-of-saying-the-divine-office-2/

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  3. Hi Daria, I was wondering if you could help me, obviously with Lent fast approaching I'm preparing my Volume 2 for Ash Wednesday I couldn't help but noticing that prayer during the day has only one antiphon for the various divisions of Day prayer, this has led me to confusion as my volume 1 and 3 have 3 Antiphons  for all 3 psalms. Any help as to how to use the Antiphons during Lent would be very much appreciated. Thank you. 

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  4. Yes, Mitchell, during any of the holy seasons (advent, Christmas, lent, easter) and also, I believe, for solemnities and feasts, there is only a single antiphon for daytime prayer. So what you do, is say that antiphon before the first psalm (or psalm section), say the Glory Be at the end of the psalm, then proceed right into the next psalm, etc. At the end of the third psalm, you repeat that antiphon.

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  5. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  6. Daria,

    I am sorry to hear about your mother and brother, God bless them. I will say the office of the dead for them.

    Here is some news to cheer you up. As you may recall, back in 2012 they found in a library in Bavaria a codex with several of the great Origen's Homilies on the Psalms. Translation work is done on them by joseph Trigg. They cover Psalms 15, 31, 66,73,74,76,77, 80n and 81 WE also have those Homilies on the Psalms by Origen translated by Rufinus in the pipeline for Psalms 36, 37 and 38. All of this is Septuagint numbering, as used by the early Christians.
    So, there you go!

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    1. Nice to hear from you, Jim. When you say "in the pipeline" does that mean there is a planned publication? When might that be?

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  7. Both are to be published by the Catholic University of America, probably in late 2018 or 2019. I have had the privilege of reading a translation of one of the five (5!) homilies on Psalm 77. Origen, as usual, explains scripture by using scripture, following St. Paul.

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