Saturday, June 3, 2017

Ordinary Time Alert!

Sunday is Pentecost; Ordinary time starts on Monday. So we will be in a week of Ordinary time that has no Sunday. Which week will that be, you ask?

The ninth week.

How do I know that?

Because looking back at my church calendar I see that the last week of ordinary time we had (just before Lent started) was the 8th.   Therefore, we pick up OT  again with the 9th week.

The psalter will be week I. I know this because 9 is one more than 8. All weeks that are multiples of 4 will use week IV of the psalter. Multiples of 4, plus 1, will always use week I of the psalter. Multiples of 4, plus 2, will always use week II of the psalter, and so on.  Memorize this rule and save yourself the bother of having to look things up.

The next two weeks after this one (10th and 11th weeks) will simlarly not have ordinary Sundays because they are the feasts of the Most Holy Trinity and Corpus Christi, respectively. But each following Monday will resume with the regular order of the psalter: week II after Trinity Sunday and week III after Corpus Christi.  We finally get an actual Sunday or Ordinary time on June25th.

Does this make everything clear?

Pentecost Blessings to you all.


16 comments:

  1. Happy Pentecost!

    A very abrupt transition indeed from the festal season to tempus per annum. I am grateful that we in the Ordinariates have the Pentecost Octave/Whitsuntide (including its ember days) restored to our calendar. I'm all for simplifying and trimming minor feasts, but why the Pentecost Octave had to go, makes no sense at all.

    NLM had a good reflection on this a while back: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2012/06/pentecost-grandest-octave.html?m=1

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  2. Yes, I know. Pentecost seems to deserve an Octave. But I guess we can see a silver lining/meaning in the loss: the apostles weren't supposed to sit back and celebrate the gifts of the Holy Spirit--they got right to work. We could observe the non-octave by doing some small act of evangelization each day.

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    1. This was posted yesterday (June 8, 2017) about the loss of the Pentecost Octave:
      http://www.ncregister.com/blog/edward-pentin/pentecost-octave-where-art-thou

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  3. I thought which week we pick up with after Pentacost was actually counted backwards from when Advent must start. Isn't there a case where a week of OT must be skipped for this reason?

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    1. It looks like we have all the weeks of Ordinary Time this year except for Wednesday through Saturday of the 8th Week in Ordinary Time. That's only four days. A lot more is missing in the 1962 Roman Breviary between Epiphany and Ash Wednesday and I think even after Pentecost. It's a mess.

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  4. I too thought Ordinary Time was about counting backwards from Advent. Isn't it fun to learn something new :-)

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  5. Uuummm ... what?

    Seriously though, I do have a question. Do we still say "alleluia" after all antiphons and the Glory Be now that we are in "ordinary time?"

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    1. My understanding is that you do the Alleluia all year long except during lent. Although in practice, it seems to get dropped by most people after Pentecost.

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    2. Depends. You do say Alleluia at the beginning after the introductory versicle and response (O God, come to my assistance etc.) yearlong except during Lent (and Pre-Lent/Septuagesima where applicable), but you only add Alleluia to antiphons between First Vespers of Easter and Second Vespers of Pentecost (in the ordinary form) or the end of Whitsuntide/the Pentecost Octave (in the Ordinariate and the extraordinary form).

      See also Compline's responsory, "Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit," to which "alleluia, alleluia" is added only during Eastertide.

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    3. Dan, sorry I forgot to return to this. What I meant was what imperialreaction said above. The alleluia remains after the introductory versicle's "Glory Be" all year except lent. It also remains after the antiphon to the Invitatory on Sundays. My volume II breviary (Pauline) does indeed have it in those places for Ordinary time.

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  6. That's what I thought but it disappears from the breviaries other than Vol. 2.

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  7. I am not too Fond of External Solemnities/Transfered Feasts...

    Anyway,Any Tips for Bridging Praying the Breviary and Active Participation of The Mass?

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    1. Check the General Instructions of the Liturgy of the Hours, Chapter II-VII, which addresses that.

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    2. Seems to me that just making it a regular habit to pray the LOTH will improve one's participation. There's that old expression about the mass being the jewel and the LOTH being it's golden setting.

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    3. I Have Read a Better Anology which is Unbeatable: "The Mass is the Wedding Banquet and The Office is the Wedding Song".

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  8. Since I'm praying the Divine Office as a private devotion, I frequently pray Morning Prayer or Evening Prayer before the Mass of the day to "prepare" myself -- mind and heart -- to participate more fully in Mass. Personally, I don't want to miss any Hour to be with God and pray the Psalms.

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