Wednesday, November 21, 2012

Weekly Q&A-Presentation of Mary edition




Today's memorial, the feast of the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, commemorates an event that to some appears to be on pretty shaky historical ground. The actual account of the three year old Mary being taken to the temple in Jerusalem, to live as a consecrated virgin until she was espoused to St. Joseph, comes form the Protoevengelium of James. This second century work was rejected from inclusion from the canon of scripture, but that does not mean every element it relates has been rejected as unfactual. Since the Church celebrates Mary's presentation in the temple, we can be confident that this event happened, although perhaps less confident as to some of the details the book of James relates about it.

More interesting are the hints to be found in Sacred Scripture that there were, indeed, virgins who served in the temple both to do service to the priests and to engage in liturgical prayer. Taylor Marshall has an excellent summary of these scriptural passages, plus quotes from other ancient Jewish sources, here on his blog, Canterbury Tales

Okay, weekly Q&A time! Given last week's excitement (excitement for Divine Office geeks, that is) one question you might have is, "What's the Big Deal about the Revised Grail Psalter? It's different, but how different, and is it a better kind of different?"

I'll be answering that shortly, with a description of my quick comparison of Revised vs. current Grail Psalms.
So stay tuned.

Meanwhile, I have to defrost a turkey, buy pearl onions which I'd forgotten when I shopped yesterday, and tidy up the place a bit for Thanksgiving. But I'll check in to answer any questions about the Liturgy of the Hours that you may have this week.

Also, between shopping sprees and football games this weekend, look for one of my special, Paul Harvey-style Catholic stories.











1 comment:

  1. The Grail Psalms are the result of a project commissioned by a lay women's group in England in the 1950's or thereabouts. The aim of the translators was to achieve a translation that was true to the rhythm of the original Hebrew versions,also they can be sung to liturgical music written by a Jesuit composer named Gelineau (a happy coincidence?). Ah, the wonders of Google.

    I think this translation is different; I wouldn't choose it as a regular text for meditation, but I'm not sure, given the objectives of the translators, that I'd say it's either better or worse than others such as the RSV-CE2, it's just different.

    Good Q&A, Happy Thanksgiving

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