Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Weekly Q&A Time plus Welcome...



...to new blog followers Karen Louise and David, not to mention other, more anonymous types who have recently added Coffee and Canticles to their reader feeds.
Wednesday is Q&A day.
Unless I forget to write this post on time, in which case it may be Thursday or Friday. But I'm on my game this week.

Those of you who do the Office of Readings: are all those readings from the Book of Revelation leaving you shaking your head and wondering what it's all about? Has you understanding of this book been further confused by reading one or more of the Left Behind novels back in the day when these books were the latest Christian fad?

A sure cure for the Apocalytpic heebie-jeebies it the Ignatius Catholic  Study Bible. Introductory notes, footnotes, and word studies  by Scott Hahn and Curtis Mitch really help the reader to make some sense of the final book of the Bible.

I hope everyone is enjoying all the extra alleluias and antiphons reminding us the the Lord has risen. There's nothing like the Divine Office to keep us mindful of the Easter season for its entire 50 days.

Okay. Any questions about breviaries, psalms, feasts, seasons, rubrics, whatever--the comment box is the place to ask.






8 comments:

  1. Wow, this is the first blog that I have begun following which welcomed me in the first few days (not that I expected it, but nice none the less). I'm a seminarian and always find it encouraging when the lay faithful are so excited about praying the Office. I hope to inspire more to pick up this devotion because, as you have proven, it is a great way to balance the day with work and prayer. Also, once a priest I'll have more folks to pray in community with. God bless you and keep up the good work!

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    1. Wait! I welcomed someone named David. Oh, I get it! Jonathan and David.
      Glad you're here and really glad you are studying for the priesthood. Will pray for your perseverance.

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  2. I have the one-volume version of Christian Prayer and I can't make sense of how to do the office of readings. I can't find anything to tell me the format in the one-volume, and how to know what readings are for the day that it is. What is the format, and where do I fund a guide as to what readings? Thanks! I really enjoy your blog.

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    1. It's no wonder that the OOR in Christian Prayer makes no sense to you. It doesn't make sense to anyone! Christian Prayer gives the complete 4-week psalter for the OOR, but only a tiny fraction of the readings. Perhaps the intention of the editors was to give people a taste of the OOR so they would know whether they liked it enough to go on to purchase the complete, 4-volume breviary. Other than that, what they give you has no real use. Plus, as you mention, they don't even give any suggestions about what to do with those readings, other than select a reading of your choice based on the seasonal division.
      The full OOR has a different biblical reading and a different non-bliblical reading for everyday of the year. If you want to get the real thing, but aren't ready for the financial outlay of purchasing the 4-volume, I recommend that you go online for the OOR. Three online breviaries are listed at the top left of this page. There are also mobile apps for these if you have a tablet, an ipod touch, or a smart phone.
      I'll add here that the Daytime Prayer in Christian prayer is also "selections". You get two weeks' worth rather than the 4-week psalter. Another good reason to make use of online resources.

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  3. I am a brand new Catholic. I have been loving learning about and praying the Liturgy, and your blog and book have really helped. My question is, what is a solemnity and how is it different from a feast?

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  4. Solemnities are the highest ranked feasts of the Church, such that the liturgies (mass and liturgical hours) for solemnities are never optional, and take precedence over other celebrations, with few exceptions, e.g. if a solemnity occurs on a Sunday in lent or advent, it's celebration is carried over to the following Monday. If a solemnity occurs during Holy Week (as the Annunciation did this year) it is carried over to Easter Monday. They are the liturgical equivalent of Sunday. Solemnities have a "vigil" just as Sundays do, so they get an Evening Prayer I on the preceding evening.
    Quite a few Solemnities naturally occur on Sundays (Easter, Pentecost, Corpus Christi, Holy Trinitiy, Sacred Heart) but most of them have fixed days.
    At mass on a Solemnity we will say the Gloria and the Creed, even if its on a weekday.
    Do not confuse solemnities with holy days of obligation. These are the solemnities that national bishop's conferences determine that the faithful are obliged to attend mass, but this varies from one country to another, and there are many solemnities that are not days of obligation.
    I hope that answers your question. I might be leaving something out, but this is off the top of my head. No doubt another reader will add a comment if there is anything else of significance that I forgot.

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    1. And I'd forgottten to say above, welcome, dear friend, to the God's family and the mystical body of Christ! May you never lose the joy of your conversion.

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  5. Daria - Just wanted to say thanks for your welcome in your post (blush! :-O). I'm a convert from Anglicanism and just confirmed on Easter Vigil a few weeks ago. It's been a long process for me (a 4-1/2 year journey from announcing intention to convert, waiting on my husband's Annulment to be approved, attending the mandatory pre-Marriage course, RCIA). Throughout these long years, I have been attending Mass, joined the choir and the Catholic Women's' League and it so helped with obtaining patience in the entire process. I also gained so many graces that there was no turning back for me. As a neophyte now, I am looking forward to my continued growth in the church.

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