Wednesday, April 30, 2014

I'm Back, and a Handy Hint for Hectic Days...plus Q&A

First there was Holy Week. Then there was Easter. We do these things in a Big Way in the Sockey household, not just with spiritual activity, but with family customs, so the mother of the house was not available for a lot of blogging. Then there was my daughter's wedding on Easter Friday. It was great, it was beautiful, but I'm still in recovery mode.

Also,on Sunday  I  became eligible for the younger end of senior citizen discounts, if you know what I mean. And besides being entitled to an extra 10% off at Goodwill, it also excuses me from moving a tad slower than formerly, right?

I'm trying to catch up on comments and questions on the last month's posts that need responses. If you don't get one today, please send any questions again, because that will mean I've somehow not seen it.

During the last few days surrounding the wedding I wasn't able to maintain my schedule of praying five liturgical hours a day. I don't fret when these situations come up--it's  a mother's vocation to attend to family first, and I have a hard time quickly adapting my schedule to sudden, huge, temporary changes.  But I do want to remain at least somewhat attached to the daily liturgical cycle especially now, during the Easter season.  So I dip into the breviary as often as I can, and just read little bits of it as a devotional.   If nothing else, it's worthwhile just to read the antiphons for the psalms and the gospel canticle, and the concluding prayer. They speak of all the things that spring from the Redemption: baptism, forgiveness of sin, the Eucharist, the Church, and above all, joy, glory, praise!

Then, if I have a chunk of six or seven  whole minutes to myself, I'll also try to read the readings from the Office of Readings.   These shortcuts leave liturgical prayer behind, but give me a rich, if brief devotional prayer.

Then, when life returns to normal and prayer gets back on schedule, I don't feel that I've totally missed out.

Do you ever do this sort of thing? What is your favorite "bare bones" method of staying attached to the Liturgy of the Hours during hectic times?   Or do you have any other questions about the Liturgy of the Hours?   I'm back in the saddle, so fire away!




8 comments:

  1. Thank you for sharing that Daria. I find myself doing much the same when I'm busy. At work I carry a copy of the smaller "Daytime Prayer". On the job I'm often on the road and can usually find a few minutes here and there. It might just be the reading and prayer for that particular hour that I fit in, or I might have time for the everything, which is brief anyway. I like the psalms during the day because they are so fitting for the daily struggles we all deal with. - Peace be with you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, I think the daytime psalms are a real treasure. We really need them, especially 119, as a break in our busy workday, reminding us to keep doing the right thing, one foot in front of the other.

      Delete
  2. Lately I've been sticking to Morning and Evening Prayer plus Night Prayer (being a former Anglican, this habit is apparently hard wired in my soul).

    But I also make an effort to cover all the Psalms during the four-week cycle (also a stubborn Anglican habit), so I supplement my routine by just praying the Psalms for the Office of Readings and Daytime Prayer sometime during the day.

    ReplyDelete
  3. May I add my two cents....like yourselves I am anchored in Morning and Evening...and enjoy chanting during the Holy Seasons...tho it drives my family cracked....and when I di not have time, I sit and ponder the Readings of the Office of Readings...sometimes between classes at school I can do the daytime prayers.
    I am looking forward this weekend as I am with my son at a Volleyball tournament in Québec...not too far from the Benedictine monastery of St-Benoît-du-lac and I have my French language breviary and plan to join in as many vêpres and laudes as the schedule allows me. I do switch the language of my prayer...english, français, and I have a small Irish Gaelic edition of evening prayer I use as well.
    Love this little site...loved your book, and am planning on using it as part of our School's Faith Formation introducing The LOH. Beannachtaí na Càisc!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tri-lingual LOH! That's impressive. Like Russ, above, who sometimes does his in Japanese. My husband got his Master's at Laval many years ago and lived with the Asumptionists at Montmartre Canadien (Sillery). I tend to be a little self conscious about chanting when the family is around, but when they're out I enjoy it.

      Delete
  4. Hello! I have been adding Polish offices in English on my blog http://polishbreviary.wordpress.com If anyone would like to get to know the Polish Liturgy of the Hours, you're more than welcome! AMDG!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. PolishBreviary looks wonderful! I'll be using it myself now and then, since I am a Polish American. I'll mention your site in a post this week.

      Delete
    2. Thank you! I'm going to start the June celebrations soon as there are plenty.

      Delete