Monday, August 11, 2014

Quick Question for Brits, Canadians, Aussies...

...and other assorted users of the Harper Collins breviary, three volume edition.
When I wrote my book two years ago, I stated that the Harper Collins breviary takes its scripture readings from the Jerusalem Bible. That was my memory from using the HC single-volume edition for a while back in the early 80s.

Since the book came out, I've seen it noted in several places that in fact, the HC reaadings come from a  variety of Bible translations: some from the Jerusalem, some from the RSV, and even some from the "Good News" bible of the 1970s.

Can anyone here who uses HC clarify this for me, and also give an estimate on the ratios of the various translations used? E.g., does any one translation predominate, or is it a three way split?

I ask because one American reader wants to purchase the HC based on my saying it used the Jerusalem Bible. I don't want to have him lead astray. HC breviaries are pretty expensive when purchased here in the states, so we have to make sure it's worth his while to do so.

14 comments:

  1. Daria---I've been using the UK 3 volume breviary for almost a year. I should mention that I also used the US version since 75 so the change of editions was welcomed at least until the new revised US is released. Yes the readings do use JB 40% (approx.) RSV 40% (approx.) and the rest of the readings (20%) use the Knox, and TEV (Good News). Also the majority of the Canticles use the RSV while some other use Grail Version and 2 from the JB. Interesting that Isaiah is split between the RSV Chap 1 thru 39 then chap 40-66 JB. Romans also is split between RSV and Knox.

    As I stated above I been using this edition for almost a year and I enjoy it better than the US. The antiphons and prayers are slightly different than the US. I like the set up of the book. They give you two options for the Gospel Canticles--the Grail and or the ICEL. They also have a separate section on the Gospel antiphons for the commons should one want to use only these antiphons to celebrate saints memorials or options.

    I hope the above is useful.

    Lenny

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  2. Lenny,
    Thank you SO much for this clarification! This was a huge help. but this does bring up another question/confusion. I had always assumed that if we are praying the LOTH, that even though the scripture translations might be different, that we were all praying the same prayers together as a the Church universal. But if antiphons and prayers are differnt, are we truly all praying the same prayers around the world?

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    1. David--regarding the antiphons and prayers being different I am referring to the wording and structure. The UK edition is more poetic than the US version. The meaning is the same. Keep in mind that even though those praying the office are praying the same psalms various countries, diocese, religious communities may be also be praying a different ferial or sanctoral due local or regional celebrations. However in most cases yes we are all praying the same prayers in a given day. With the revision of the LOTH being prepared it may be that it will be like the current translation of the Mass--it will be the same the world over. At this point I am not sure if the UK version is being revised--I'm only aware of the US.

      Lenny

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    2. David one other point I neglected to make---I do not know why but the UK edition of the breviary was not created under the ICEL as was the US edition. For some reason it was left to several scholars in England, Wales and Ireland to work on the current translation. I do find it interesting that they did not fall under ICEL guidance.

      Lenny

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  3. Yes, the antiphons and prayers are a different translation of the Latin typical edition. For example, the antiphon for psalm 133 at Night Prayer after Evening Prayer I of Sundays is, in Latin, "In nóctibus benedícite Dóminum." The UK/Ireland/Etc version of that is "Bless the Lord through the night." I think that's dead on, as a translation. The USA version has "In the silent hours of night, bless the Lord." I don't know where the "silent hours" came from? There are many other examples like this.

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  4. HI All! What a HUGE help this post and responses were!!! Thank you Ms. Sockey, Lenny and Sr. Eleanor for helping me to better understand the differences. I am going to obtain Volume 3 of the Collins Divine Office and see how it works for me! Thanks again!
    ~ Dave

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  5. Actually in Canada (English Speaking) we use the US version, but I was interested in the UK version, so last year I got a 2007 edition of Collins': "Daily Prayer" (Single Volume). I would agree with what others have posted about it. One thing I might add: the hymns are quiet different. Probably about 15-20% are the same in both versions. The UK version has a lot more 19th century Anglican hymns, as well additional hymns by more contemporary writers such as Fr. James Quinn and the Benedictine Nuns of Stanbrook Abbey that are not in the US version.

    Interesting discussion everybody - God Bless.

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    1. It might be late to bring this up, but some time ago I was reading reviews (on Amazon I think) and someone complained about the physical quality of the Collins editions, saying the pages came loose pretty easily. Could anyone speak to that before David spends his $$ on a new 3 volume Collins breviary?

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    2. I have the three volume and I find the quality is equal to or better than the US. Pages are sewn in and hardcover is solid. Been using for year with no quality issues. In fact I would not hesitate to purchase again.

      Lenny V

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    3. I *am* a little confused about how these 3 volumes are bound... most of the descriptions i read say 'leather' and yet i have seen a few that say 'hardcover' including Lenny's comment above. Are these volumes leather, hard cover, or a leather-hardcover (like the new missal)? Thanks!

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    4. guess more leather/hardcover similar to the new missal.

      Lenny

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    5. A bit late, but the volumes are not leather bound.

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  6. One caveat: sometimes the intercessions at MP and EP in the UK editions are completely different from the Latin originals. This is especially noticeable on Sundays. It is one of the few areas where the ICEL version, on the whole, has done a better job.

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  7. I concur about the intercessions. ICEL got those pretty good.

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