Saturday, October 25, 2014

Love this verse

"Before whom the stars at their posts
 shine and rejoice.
When He calls them, they answers, "Here we are!"
 shining with joy for their Maker.

-Baruch 3: 34


5 comments:

  1. Hello Daria, thank you for you post. I recently purchased the Christian Prayer breviary, and I am managing it pretty well in conjunction with the Divineoffice and Universalis web site, but there’s a section at the end of the Psalter which are the Biblical readings and Non biblical readings which I am not understanding where they fit into the Hours. I wonder if you could give an orientation on this matter.

    With best wishes, Norman

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    1. Great question and you are not the only one who ever asks this. These readings are selections from the Office of Readings. The complete Office of Readings is only found in the four volume breviary or on the online breviaries that you are familiar with. The Office of Readings may be done at any time of day although the tradition in monasteries is usually to do it just before Morning Prayer. It takes a bit longer than the other hours, but those readings are worth it. Great way to read lots of the bible over the course of the year, and the second readings are a great intro to the fathers of the Church. Christian prayer does have the complete four week psalter for the Office of Readings, starting around p 1785 (in my edition, yours might be different), but it only has a handful of readings as you have discovered. I'm not sure why the editors of Christian Prayer even did this--it's so incomplete. If you are interested in doing the Office of Readings on a regular basis, just go with an online breviary. The verse I posted above was from the first reading in today's Office of Readings, by the way.

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  2. Thanks Daria, very thorough! Have a happy Sunday.

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  3. Hello Daria, I would like to consult you on the following. I recently purchased “The Dive Office” by St Alphonsus de Ligouri - I am enjoying it immensely, but having difficulty with the numeration of the Psalms in this book, as compared to the Psalter (Christian Prayer). I’m wondering if you know the book I’m referring to here, and if you could give us guidelines on how to get the best out of it.
    Best wishes Norman

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    1. There are two different systems used for numbering the psalms. One is based on the Hebrew manuscripts, the other on the Greek (Septuagint) versions. Here is an excerpt from a scripture course by Fr. William Most (which is archived in the archived library at www.catholicculture.org First we must explain that there are two numbering systems for the Psalms, one following the Hebrew numbers, the other following the Septuagint (LXX) numbers. Both systems are the same for 1-8. But then: 9-10 of Hebrew = 9 of the LXX. 11-113 Hebrew = 10-112 LXX; 114-15 Hebrew = 113 LXX; 116 Hebrew = 114-15 LXX; 117-146 = 116-145 LXX; 147 Hebrew = 146-47 LXX; 148-150 = 148 - 150 LXX. Most modern versions follow the Hebrew system, while the older Catholic versions follow the LXX and the Vulgate.

      So your Ligouri would be using the Septuagint (LXX) system. Newer Bibles used the Hebrew system pretty consistently. Neither system is considered part of the deposit of faith, or divinely inspired, since the original texts of scripture had no numbering of psalms, or of chapters and verses.

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