Thursday, December 11, 2014

Gift Guide for Breviary Buffs plus Q&A

Otherwise known as...Divine Office Supplies!

Here are a few books that can enrich your understanding and experience of the Liturgy of the Hours. If any appeals to you, send a link to those who want to know what you want for Christmas. Or, to be really crass (as I sometimes am), order the book, toss it at your loved one, and say, "Here, give this to me for Christmas."

Clicking on the pictures will take you to each book at Amazon.

The School of Prayer is a wonderful, in depth introduction to the Liturgy of the Hours: what it is, where is comes from, why you should pray it.   Best of all, commentary that a layman can understand in every psalm and canticle (from morning and evening prayer) in the 4-week psalter. If you want to know more about interpreting the psalms than what is in my own book, this is the next step up.




Most of you either have The Everyday Catholic's Guide to the LOTH or have absorbed most of what's in it through reading this blog. But if you are trying to explain to your friends why you love the Liturgy of the Hours--and want them to try it too--this is a quick and informative guide that will do a good job of getting them interested. Also, if you are still stumbling with those questions about finding the correct prayers for a saint's memorial, or whether a feast takes precedence over a Sunday, etc., chapter 7 is a great reference guide to keep handy.


Not to be  confused with the first title on this list, Pope Benedict XVI's A School of Prayer is a beautiful collection of papal audience addresses given in 2011 and 2012. It's subtitle--The Saints Show Us How to Pray--is misleading, because only a few of these are about what particular saints taught. Most of them are about prayer traditions in the Bible, the prayer of Christ, liturgical prayer, and the psalms as prayer, and therefore, highly relevant to people like us who liturgically pray the words of the Bible, especially the psalms, and try to  pray them in union with Christ!  Chapter 7 , The People of God at Prayer: the Psalms, was to me worth the price of the book.

That's enough for today. More titles to come in my next post.

Feel free to use the comment section for any questions about the Liturgy of the Hours.


15 comments:

  1. Daria, I am not sure you are aware of this new book that was published in 2014 by Fr. Timothy Gallagher, OMV entitled "Praying the Liturgy of the Hours: A Personal Journey." It's about his experiences as a priest praying the Office. I just received it and have not yet begun reading it but it has favorable reviews by other clerics and is available via Amazon. Fr. Gallagher has been on EWTN many times and is a well known retreat master on Ignatian prayer techniques.

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    1. Just finished reading this on the recommendation of you and several others who told me about it some time ago. I am acquainted with Fr. Gallagher and his work. Was surprised that it took him so long to figure out things about the LOTH that I'd figured any priest would know! It is a good book, although I thought the ending was kind of abrupt. I see he lists my book in the bibliography, so I can't complain.

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  2. Happy O Adonai! :-)

    I love being in the O Antiphons for Advent, but have a brief question.

    Several days ago, I noticed that in the Proper of Saints, Dec. 21 (this Sunday) is shown as a `commemoration.` I don't have my Volume IV with me at the moment (unusual, but we're having a Christmas lunch today and I won't have time to pray midday prayer while at work, so I didn't bring it...I know...), so I can't say for whom, but I don't remember ANY other day in the Proper of Saints being listed as a commemoration throughout the entire year. What is this? How does this work? Does this just reference the fact that there are no required Memorials from Dec. 17-24 and during the Octave of Christmas?

    As usual, if you can point me to the right place in the General Instruction, that would also be of great help to my understanding.

    Thanks!

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    1. Doug, I believe that Commemoration is just another word for optional memorial, but some publisher use one and some use the other.

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    2. You add a commemoration to that day's office. See below:

      http://forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=206959

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    3. After the Second Reading from the Proper of Seasons, and its responsory, you will read the Reading for St Thomas Becket and say its responsory. The Closing Prayer will be that of St Thomas Becket.
      For Morning and Evening Prayer, after the Closing Prayer, you omit the conclusion and say the Magnificat/Benedictus antiphon for St Thomas Becket followed by the closing prayer.
      Same thing for St Sylvester on December 31.

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    4. Thanks, Michael. I've been swamped with activity these last few weeks and havent been keeping up with the blog. Glad I'm not the only one who can answer these questions.

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  3. Hi Daria, I wanted to send you a picture of my Spanish brievary which I bought here in Barcelona. Please send me an Email address if you want to see it.

    joseph

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  4. I just sent a post, but it disappeared on me. Perhaps it's awaiting moderation? I don't want to send a repeat if you actually got it. Let me know if you received it, if you can. God bless, Michele

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  5. Ok, I'm sending again as I don't see it. I am looking for a little prayer that I thought would have been in the Hours today or yesterday. It is regarding Simeon, and goes something like this, 'The old man held the baby, but the baby is the old man's Lord.' That isn't it exactly, but sort of. Is it this week some time? I can't remember if it is part of the Office of Readings or maybe an antiphon? I'm using an electronic version, and so I can't really flip around to look for it. It's one of those things that jumps out at me and that I love. Thanks for your help if you can - a blessed Christmas to you! Michele

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    1. I see both of your comments here, so I'm not sure what happened on your end. I believe the antiphon you are thinking about appears at the feast of the Presentation on February 2nd....yes, just checked it. Evening Prayer I, antiphon for the Magnificat on Feb 2.

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    2. Thank you!! I will wait, then… :-)

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  6. Office of Readings 12/31 [iBreviary ]
    Saint Sylvester, Pope, may be commemorated today. The Collect of the Day is omitted, the Proper Reading is read, and the Collect for the Saint used as the Concluding Prayer. In those places where this day is kept as a Solemnity or Feast, the texts can be found in the Common of Pastors: For a Pope, found in the ‘Prayers’ section of the iBreviary.

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  7. [It looks like iBreviary got it right].
    General Instruction of the Liturgy of the Hours:
    239. During privileged seasons, if it is desired to celebrate the office of a saint on a day assigned to his or her memorial:
    a. in the office of readings, after the patristic reading (with its responsory) from the Proper of Seasons, a proper reading about the saint (with its responsory) may follow, with the concluding prayer of the saint;
    b. at morning prayer and evening prayer, the ending of the concluding prayer may be omitted and the saint's antiphon (from the proper or common) and prayer may be added.

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