Monday, October 5, 2015

Look to the Liturgy (not Twitter) for Answers

I just had to share this lovely post from Vultus Christi.  I had written recently about those instances where we find a line in the day's Office that speaks to us personally. But this post takes that idea and runs with it with greater depth. The hook is the turmoil surrounding this week's Synod on the Family in Rome:  how many of us are less than edified by stories of various machinations and worried about possible outcomes. But this author has the right perspective on it all:

Before going down to Vespers last evening, I remarked to Father Benedict that I was far more interested in what the Magnificat Antiphon would be than in the latest tweets about the Synod. I was not disappointed. 

So go read the rest.  

Take note that the monastery where the author resides is using  the traditional (Extraordinary form) breviary and missal, so you will not find his quotes from yesterday's mass and vespers to match your Christian Prayer breviary!

9 comments:

  1. Are those using a Roman office? I was under the impression that they used the EF for the sacraments and sacramentals while using a Benedictine office. I don't claim any particular knowledge there; it's just the impression I had.

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    1. You know, this is my first experience with this blog and monastery. I made a quick guess but you are probably right.

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    2. I'm genuinely curious now. The same situation applies to the Benedictines of Norcia.

      In any case, Vultus Christi is one of my go-to blogs. The Benedictine Monks of Perpetual Adoration really seem to be on their game, vocationally speaking.

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  2. Thanks, Daria. How beautiful and just what I needed to read today.

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    1. Hey, nice hearing from you, Cynthia! We have to catch up sometimes.

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  3. GILH # 145. Where is this supplement found?

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    1. It was never published in English. I've heard that Spanish breviaries have the two-year cycle.

      There is a list at this site:
      http://www.stutler.cc/russ/resources.html
      It's from Christian Prayer and is apparently the 2-year cycle. You would have to use your own Bible for that and wouldn't have responsories for hte readings.

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  4. There is a six-volume set in Latin and French that has the two-year lectionary cycle with scriptural and patristic readings. See link below:

    http://www.abbayedesolesmes.fr/product_category/122

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  5. There is a six-volume set in Latin and French that has the two-year lectionary cycle with scriptural and patristic readings. See link below:

    http://www.abbayedesolesmes.fr/product_category/122

    ReplyDelete