Friday, March 9, 2018

Liturgy of the Hours, Second Edition

I guess things are moving along but who knows when it'll be published. Here are excerpts from the USCCB website:

Revised Grail Psalms
March 19, 2010: The Revised Grail Psalms were granted recognitio from the Holy See's Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments.
After four years of use by some religious houses and review by the USCCB, a series of modifications were proposed.

November 11, 2014: the U.S. Bishops voted to accept the modifications. If confirmed by the Holy See, this new version of the Revised Grail Psalms will be used in the Liturgy of the Hours, Second Edition. They are known for being remarkably faithful to the original Hebrew while also being rendered in a "sprung rhythm" to facilitate singing.

As of early 2018, the modified Revised Grail Psalms are awaiting confirmation by the Holy See.


Old and New Testament Canticles (including Gospel Canticles)
June 11, 2015: The USCCB approves new translations of the Old and New Testament canticles. Prepared by Conception Abbey, these canticles are rendered in the same "sprung rhythm" as the Revised Grail Psalms.


As of early 2018, the Old and New Testament canticles are awaiting confirmation by the Holy See.



3 comments:

  1. The revision of the NABRE is due in 2025, so I would assume the LOTH would have to follow that? It will be nice to have the same translation in the Lectionary, LOTH, and Bible. Not sure if the next edition of the NABRE will include the Revised Grail Psalms or not. I think it would be a good idea to include them and the LOTH canticle translations!

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  2. Jonny, I"m 99% certain you won't see the Revised Grail Psalms in the NABRE. Two entirely different teams of translators, two entirely different copyrights!

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  3. The LOTH2E is going to be GLORIOUS...

    I just finished comparing the RGP to the old GP and the RGP are very faithful and conservative with regard to revising the original GP, but also improve much when they did revise.

    The hymns, o the Hymns! The 1st LOTH excluded many of the great Latin hymns of the Liturgiam Horarum simply because no acceptable translation existed at the time and they needed to get an approved English edition out, so they substituted them with well known English hymns. This had the unhappy effect of including hymns by Martin Luther and various Protestant folks, while excluding ancient hymns by great Saints like Ambrose.

    Finally, the current translation of the Intercessions and Collects are seriously deficient when compared side by side to the Latin typical edition, and if the 2011 Missal is an indication of how much more faithful LOTH2E will be, it will be a VAST improvement.

    If you go on the USCCB website, it appears that all the work is done and all that needs to happen is final approval by the Holy See and then publication - the USCCB said back in 2015 that 2020 was the earliest likely date, so I'm hoping and praying that we'll get the LOTH2E maybe in 2021 - what a glorious early Christmas present the USCCB could vouchsafe to the Church if we got the LOTH2E for Advent of 2021!

    I'm so excited for the new LOTH that I am considering taking a solemn vow to bind myself to daily recitation of the Office once the 2nd edition comes out...

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