Wednesday, April 4, 2018

So..How's that Revised Breviary Coming Along?

My co-blogger Mike's previous post about a reprinting of the Latin Liturgy of the Hours led to some discussion in the comments about the long awaited revision/retranslation of the American English edition.

Obviously this is something we are all waiting for with great longing, or great curiosity, or perhaps great trepidation, depending on one's perceptions on the abilities of the U.S. Bishops' committee on Divine Worship and ICEL --that is, International Commission on English in the Liturgy. 

This blog was probably the first source to break the story about the proposed revision in this post and in  this one. But that was back in 2012. Progress since then has been slow but steady. If you want more details on this from the only reliable source, then go to this page from the USCCB website for a complete rundown. I'm so glad that Mike noted this pages in those comments the other day. It gives the reader a good sense of why this process is so slow. Some parts of the LOTH (in the United States) are taken from the New American Bible, while the psalms are the Revised Grail Psalms, the work of the monks of Conception Abbey in Missouri. Then there's the antiphons, Intercessions,hymns and concluding prayers, which are the work of ICEL, translating texts that come from the Vatican publishing house. So we are talking about four different entities, four different copyright holders.

You have to be a serious breviary nerd to read the entire piece, but it should answer all your questions.  Unless, of course, you are from the UK. If any Brits, Aussies, Canadians, or Kiwis out there know how, if at all, the Commonwealth bishops are coordinating with the USA on this,or just doing a new translation of their own, please share the news!

As I keep telling people, the Bishops and these other entities are share this trait in common with the Lord: to their eyes, "a thousand years are like yesterday, come and gone, or like a watch in the night."(Psalm 90:4)  So the rest of us just have to be patient.


21 comments:

  1. I saw this in passing:
    An English version of the proper texts for the Memorial of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of the Church will be included in the Liturgy of the Hours, Second Edition, after translation by the International Commission on English in the Liturgy, approval by the USCCB, and confirmation by the Holy See.

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  2. This is a fantastic, comprehensive resource. Thanks, Daria and Mike!

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  3. A couple of encouraging bits of info from the USCCB page:

    Apparently the LOTH 2nd Edition will concur with the next edition of the NAB:

    “The various readings from Scripture will be taken from the latest edition of the New American Bible. A separate project currently underway will lead to the eventual approval and confirmation of a "liturgical Bible," that is, a sole translation of the Bible that will be used in liturgical books and available for devotional study by the faithful. The liturgical Bible will be based on the New American Bible, Revised Edition. The goal is for this project to be completed around the same time as the Liturgy of the Hours.”

    Also, the Psalm anitphons will match the Psalms themselves, when they are taken from a verse in the Psalm.

    “Since many of the psalm antiphons are drawn from the texts of the psalms themselves, and since the U.S. will be using a new translation of the psalms, it was determined to revise these antiphons in light of the Revised Grail Psalms.”

    I wonder if other English speaking countries will adopt the American LOTH.... There is also an ESV-CE Bible now published in India with lectionary forthcoming, so an ESV LOTH is certainly a possibility too.

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  4. Jonny, check out the Catholic Bibles blog. You'll find a lot to read there about the lectionary and other related topics.
    http://www.catholicbiblesblog.com/

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  5. Per the USCCB webpage, the new breviary will be complete around the release of the finished NAB. That is expected around 2025.

    https://catholicbiblical.org/news-archives/nabnt-revision

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  6. As a Scripture scholar who also prays the Liturgy of the Hours, I find myself very conflicted about the apparent plan to delay the promulgation of the revised Breviary until 2025. (I am also somewhat confused, as a date of 2020 for the LOTH is still being mentioned in some quarters.) While I appreciate what the bishops are trying to do in producing yet another revision of the NAB that will be used in all of the liturgical books, I also think that the need for a new translation of the Breviary is too pressing to delay its promulgation for another seven years. Whatever one thinks of the Third Edition of the Roman Missal, its use at Mass makes it patently evident that the liturgical translations produced in the Seventies were severely lacking in fidelity to the original Latin texts. English-speaking Catholics who pray the LOTH now find themselves essentially praying in two languages, the formal equivalency of the Missal at Mass and the dynamic equivalency of the Breviary for the canonical hours. If the bishops wanted to re-issue the LOTH in 2025 (or 2026, or 2027, depending upon how long this NAB project actually ends up taking) with the re-revised New American Bible, that is fine. In the meantime, I feel that the NABRE is a sufficiently solid translation (and a vast improvement upon the 1970 version currently used in the LOTH) to justify its inclusion in a 2020 edition of the LOTH. Some people might balk at buying printed breviaries in 2020 only to have to replace them in 5-7 years (personally I wouldn’t mind), but with the availability of Breviary apps, what would be the problem with issuing an “interim” LOTH that contains the current edition of the NABRE? If the bishops really are planning to hold off on promulgating a revised LOTH until 2025, I hope and pray that they reconsider.

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    1. Stephen, are you aware of the African breviary published by Pauline Kenya? It came out in 2009. Uses the Revised Grail Psalms and NABRE. Also has the years ABC Sunday gospel canticle antiphons. I've been using this several years now, plus a book of traditional breviary hymns, and then use the seasonal collects of the day's mass after Office of Readings which can be found on various LOTH apps. All this makes it easier to wait for 2020 or 2025.

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    2. Daria, thanks to your blog I became aware of the Kenyan breviary a couple of years ago, and have toyed with the idea of getting it. I, too, use the Hymnal for the Hours in order to incorporate the actual breviary hymns into my prayer, and I pasted all of the new collects into my four volumes (yes, I'm that much of a nerd). I also have the 3-volume British set that I use occasionally. If it really looks like the new LOTH isn't going to be out until 2025, I might get the Kenyan set. Thanks for the response.

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    3. It's too bad the Kenyan breviary came out in 2009 and not 2011 - then it would have had the new collects.

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    4. Stephen, my reply to Jonny below might also have some relevance for you.

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    5. Can you please write out what NABREstands for. Sorry for the ignorance

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    6. Michelle: New American Bible Revised Edition

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    7. Stephen I'm with you 1000% on that.

      If the USCC would take your advice and issue the LOTH2E with the NABRE in 2020, and then issue an updated LOTH3E in 2025 incorporating the new 2025 NAB, I would happily buy all 4 volumes in both 20 and 25.

      You're absolutely right that the need for a new English LOTH is pressing and 7 more years is borderline unacceptable... The current LOTH is seriously deficient in the hymns and collects...

      At the very least, they could release an interim update incorporating the new English translations of the hymns and collects - heck, I'd buy all 4 volumes 3 separate times over the next decade, whatever!

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    8. Stephen or Daria, where can you get a version of the traditional hymnal in English approved for Liturgical use?

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    9. Here'e the link, Micheal. http://www.lulu.com/us/en/shop/rev-samuel-f-weber-osb/hymnal-for-the-hours/paperback/product-21799513.html

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  7. I have the American edition of the 4 volume LOTH. This may seem a bit unorthodox, but I am actually using a RSV-2CE for all the Psalms and Bible readings. I have the Psalms marked with their appropriate divisions with a fine Micron pen so I know where the antiphons go.

    My reasoning for this is twofold. First and foremost I think the RSV is more enjoyable to read. The 2ce revision was directed by the CDW, therefore is appropriate for use in liturgy, even though not specifically approved as a LOTH translation. I do not pray the LOTH as part of any formal obligation, so I am not bound to the official translation. Second, I find that the official text is sometimes sanitized by editing out certain verses. I include these in my prayer.

    I have a very nice hardback red RSV-2CE that I customized with 4 ribbon markers, and it is a joy to read and pray from this. It is just two books, this and the LOTH so it is very manageable. I set my ribbons before I start. I just started this at Easter, so I will see how it goes!

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    1. Hi Jonny,

      You might be interested to know that the RSV-2CE is the approved Liturgical lectionary for both Mass and Office for the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter in North America.

      We are still waiting for our Daily Office to be approved -- currently sitting with the CDF in Rome. However, this online version compiled by a zealous layman who has seen the manuscripts, and auto-updated daily, enables us to pray in the interim: http://prayer.covert.org

      It has the 30-day Coverdale Psalter, with all 150 included and no omissions.

      If you like the non-scriptural second reading from the LOTH's Office of Readings, you can incorporate it as a third reading after the two Scriptural readings in either Morning Prayer (Mattins) or Evening Prayer (Evensong).

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    2. Johnny, my issue with that is the LOTH is a Liturgical book, so we don't have the right to modify it as we see fit...

      I have a feeling that the way you're modifying it makes it cease to be an act of Liturgy, and downgrades it to a private devotion...

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  8. What are the odds on the new edition having more clearer instructions I.E the Memorial of St Athanasius, so instead of it saying from the Common of Pastors or Doctors of the Church, saying use the weekday Psalter with concluding Prayer or something similar to that

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  9. Mitchell, I don't know about the odds but Daria has this post on memorials of saints. Check it out.
    http://dariasockey.blogspot.com/search?q=memorials+of+saints

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  10. Hi all, may I ask what we use on Monday 21st and in terms of the UK there's a Feast Of Christ the Eternal High Priest. Now given these new additions are not in Volume 3 of the LOTH can you do Monday of the 7th week of Ordinary time or Christopher Mallagnes and Comp. or is that not in line with the Church? Thank you God Bless

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