Thursday, December 8, 2011

Questions? Comments?



Oh my!  I usually do this on Wednesdy or at the latest, early on Thursday.

But this! Is that! Time of the year! A silver bow mistletoe time!  as the prophet Andy Williams reminds us. So I actually made a non-virtual shopping trip today for the first time since Black Friday. With good results, I might add.

But since lots of my  favorite bloggers are suddenly going all, "I'm taking a break from the internet in order to immerse myself in the Advent season" on us--by which they sound like they're off in a monastery while what they're doing  is  scoring Gold Box deals and making candy cane cookies--I guess I"m not doing too bad by just taking off one day.

So...how's it going with your Divine Office? Any questions, quibbles, concerns, or comments can be brought right here. Remember, there are no dumb questions. And very few dumb comments, with the exception of one from a spammer yesterday that suggested I need some new Office Furniture.

My comment: the Office of Readings' second reading for the Immaculate Conception was just out of this world.
Way to go, St. Anselm.

And a tip of the hat to The Curt Jester for designing and offering the lovely advent wreath widget on the right.

14 comments:

  1. I ran into different psalms today for the daytime prayers when I compared divineoffice.org with ibreviary. It seemed like you could do psalms 120-128 consecutively or do a special set of three psalms for one of the daytime prayers. Anyway, I'm confused.
    Mike D.

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  2. Hmmm...I just used ibreviary today, scrolling down to do whatever it said at Midday. I didn't check divineoffice.org to see what they had....okay, I went and looked. What they had for Daytime was the wrong thing. They had Daytime prayer for Thursday of the 2nd week of Advent, instead of for the Immaculate Conception.
    Usually with Daytime prayer, if you do more than one of the daytime hours, you use the "complementary psalmody" for the extra daytime hour(s). But when there's a feast, they assign the complementary psalms to ,specific daytime hours, assuming,I guess, that religious communities that normally only say one daytime hour might do all three on a big feast.

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  3. Thanks for clearing things up. I guess I should look in my books once in a while.
    Mike D.

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  4. During solemities, you always use the complementary for all three hours, unless directed (like the IC did--lots of page flipping on that day).
    Feasts sometimes have their own antiphons, but use the Psalter for one hour and the CP for the others.

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  5. Any ideas on WHEN the hours should be done (I think there might have been a running discussion on this). Let me explain...
    I try to do the Morning Prayer when I wake up at 0500. I desire to do the Office of the Readings before daily Mass (here at 1200), but an frequently unsuccessful because work gets in the way and squeeze it in somewhere, which generally leads to me not getting to it at all.
    I have a similar problem with the Daytime Prayer, which I intend to do at 3pm, but am almost always late--always run up with guilt as I look at the other antiphons for the other hours.
    No idea when I want to do the Evening Prayer, so I do it before going to bed and skip Night Prayer (because I think combining too many is disingenous).
    Wat are other people's general schedules?

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  6. Good questions, Christopher, and a good topic for a post. That way everyone who want to has a chance to chime in. I'll do this topic next week. You and I both have the same problem of running behind schedule, especially with Evening Prayer.

    If this helps, one preferred option for OOR is to do it the evening before, analagous to a vigil mass, anytime after Evening Prayer.

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  7. @Christopher:here is a link to an older post where some people gave their ideas for time management. http://dariasockey.blogspot.com/2011/11/finding-minutes-for-hours-input-wanted.html

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  8. Thanks for the post. Hard for my over-active superego to grasp doing something at a different time than "allowed."
    LOH is a struggle for me, for sure. I am not a poet by nature, and literature and "finding meaning" in a narrative is hard [my 11th grade English teacher would still use my quote, "why is is not possible that Arthur Miller just wanted to write a play...why did it have to MEAN something...can't we read just for the story, not the message."
    But a comment from that earlier post struck me--LOH is a time to be present with God. A priest gave me some similar advice when I discussed my struggles: just let the Psalms roll around a while. Eventually they will stick.
    I am a newbie in this, but I really am trying to embrace the importance. Keep me in your prayers that these stick better than they have.

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  9. Christopher, one more thought on this:
    can't we read just for the story, not the message."

    You can read the psalms for the story, but the challenge is to find not just the ancient Hebrews, but at times, Jesus, the Church, or even just yourself in the story. I'll be doing a post on the four senses of scripture pretty soon. Watch for that. Also, since you mention not being the poetic type, I'll bet you prefer the Office of Readings above the others because it's more discursive. If time is problem, give up one of the other hours rather than miss OOR. (If I'm correct that you like the OOR best for its intellectual content.)

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  10. I was looking at the St. Joseph's Ordo today for the Divine Office and saw that it repeated Week IV. All the other sources I saw went back to Week I. Which is correct? As I went through the GI, it seems like it should go back to Week I (because it will return to week I in the first week of ordinary). But...the St. Joseph's Guide has been doing this far longer than I, so I am confused...

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  11. Meant to say that the Daytime Prayer is what was repeating Week IV.

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  12. I think using week I has to be correct for daytime prayer, since all this week we have to use Sunday of week I for morning prayer, whether to celebrate the feasts of John and the HOly Innocents, or for the Days in the octave of Christmas. It wouldn't make sense to jump to wee IV just for daytime prayer. So I think the St. Joseph guide has to be wrong.
    And yes, we start again with week I again for the first week of ordinary time.

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  13. Interesting observation of the use of Week I for the MP. Looking ahead at 2012, the St. Joseph Ordo uses the Week IV again, but it might be apples and oranges because the Fourth Sunday of Advent is two days before Christmas next year, and Ordinary Week I is likely on 31 December.

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  14. No, the first Sunday in ordinary time for the year can't start in December. Ordinary time does not start up again until after the feast of the baptism of Our Lord.

    Maybe you could email the St. Joseph guide people and ask them about this. I don't use this guide, preferring to figure it out on my own with the aid of my parish calendar and the instructions given in the breviary, so I have no idea why the guide shows week IV for the Octave of Christmas.

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