Wednesday, March 7, 2012

Welcome Newcomers, Inquirers, and How's Lent going?


Welcome to new Coffee&Canticles followers Julia and Benedicta.
In the interest of full disclosure, Julia is a long time friend, fellow homeschooler and former neighbor from my days in the diocese of Allentown, PA. I learned much from her and her husband's knowledge and example about liturgical music. I doubt she has much to learn much from my blog--she ought to have her own-- and suspect she joined mainly  to get a few laughs when I write about bad hymns and inclusive language.

Questions anyone?
Here's mine: has anyone resolved to go deeper into the Liturgy of the Hours for lent, either starting to pray it for the first time,  adding an additional hour to what you already do, making plans for a more consistent routine, or inviting someone else to pray it with you? If so , how's that working out for you? At my end, I've been sort of doing better with doing Night Prayer just a few minutes earlier  so that I'm actually paying attention to what I'm doing, and not just rushing through it in my eagerness to go to sleep. Also, I had the kids do Sunday evening vespers with me this past week, and hope to do this every Sunday from now on. Knowing how some of you have your offspring praying with you daily, I realize what a tiny baby step this is.

So, either report on your lenten progress, or as usual, ask me a question!




19 comments:

  1. When should the vigil psalms, prayers, readings, and gospel be read if joined with the OOR?
    -Mike D.

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    1. That is a great question. I never wrote about Vigils here before, and should probably do a separate post one of these days.
      Vigils is for Saturday night or the night before any solemnity. You would first do the OOR, but not say the Te Deum as you ordinarily would for Sunday's OOR. You would instead do the Office of Vigils, and conclude with the Te Deum.
      Now, I've just written that off the top of my head. When I have time later I'll double check the General Instruction. If I was wrong I'll get back to you.

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    2. I thought I was doing it backwards but it's OOR first, then OOV, then Te Deum. I notice that the Te Deum isn't recited on Sundays of Lent. Thanks,
      -Mike D.

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  2. I received a sample of the 'Give Us This Day' periodical (http://www.giveusthisday.org) recently. Are you familiar with this? It seems to be similar to the Daily Office in the way it is set-up (but I'm not very familiar with the Daily Office). My wife and I have enjoyed using it for daily prayer. Just curious if you were familiar with it and what your opinion of it is.

    Thanks

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    1. No, I wasn't familiar. It looks interesting and I have requested a sample copy. From what I see in the "look inside" slideshow, it seems to give an abbreviated version of Morning prayer, giving only one psalm instead of two plus the Old Testament Canticle. Also I did not see an antiphon with the morning psalm. But its possible the online sample doesn't show everything that is there for each day. I'll look forward to receiving the sample issue and will write a review.

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  3. Hi thank you for this blog! I wondered which hymns have preference, the weekday or the proper of seasons? Is it that as we get closer to the triduum the hymns are more prescribed?

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    1. Hi Hobbit! Nice to hear from you again. I believe that proper of season hymns should always get preference during lent, with the exception of the two solemnities that we get during lent.

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  4. I've picked up Lauds and Vespers reasonably regularly this Lent. We moved our oratory downstairs out of the bedroom the first week, because it helps to have a place to go. But I've also mostly abandoned technology - it's figure out the breviary or bust.

    We do Compline early in my house, because Compline is family prayer time, and so it has to be before the boy's bedtime. We sing it using The Office of Compline by Fr. Weber - this both helps me focus, and makes it extremely attractive to our son. He's better behaved for fifteen minutes of Compline than when just trying to get him to say one Hail Mary.

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    1. YOu might want to try the Mundelein Psalter, which I describe in several posts back in January. Look these up if you want to know more. It has Fr. Weber's chant tones for Morning and Evening Prayer for the year.
      That's wonderful that you have your little boy chanting with you.

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    2. :-) I learned about the Mundelain Psalter last summer, while I was writing my review of The Office of Compline.  But its expensive, and I have to order it online, so I don't have a copy yet.  I'm hoping to wheedle the $50 out of our tax return so we can have a copy in time for the Triduum.  I liked your reviews though, you'd have sold me if I wasn't already sold!

      My son doesn't really chant WITH us though.  But he will sit relatively quietly with us for bedtime prayers and doesn't whine, unless he's over tired (at which points all bets are off).  Before we started sung Compline, we used to have a very modest bedtime prayer of one Our Father, one Hail Mary, and the antiphon of Nunc Dimittis; but it was a constant battle with bad behavior.

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    3. Right now the Mundelein Psalter is only $41.76 on Amazon. A bit more reasonable and somehow easier on the psyche to not be forking over $50.

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  5. I have a question about today's Antiphon for the Canticle of Zechariah...what is this referring to?

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    1. Oh...wait. Is this from today's Gospel? Probably.

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    2. You got it. You are certainly an early bird. I rarely "awake the dawn" with my psalms before 8am.

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  6. I have added the Office of Readings to morning and evening prayer (Although I stil sometimes use my magnifcate for these) in addition to Divine Intimacy. Good stuff!!!

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    1. I tried Divine Intimacy one year but could not keep up, and finally dropped it. Which gives me sympathy for those who feel they cant keep up with te LOTH.

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  7. The continuing saga of LOH at the secular Franciscans...we had our visit from the regional Spiritual Assistant and mentioned that we were having trouble working out daytime prayer due to the many different "translations" we all had. He told us that we could kick off a meeting that begins at 1:30 with Evening Prayer. Feels weird to me, but they all jumped at the chance--we love praying Evening Prayer together. Daytime, you barely get started and it's over. And hey, on those days, at least I'm getting EP done before 9 PM. Might even get in Night Prayer on those days; I'm SO bad at that one.

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    1. Well, techinically you can say any hour at any time, and with EP being one of the two "hinges" of the day, then this makes sense.The General Instruction urges laity to adapt as needed. Although I can't resist adding that it might make a tad bit more sense to conclude rather than begin your meeting with EP. It will be that much later in the day, and the "end of the day" feeling of some of the EP prayers will work with the conslusionof your meeting.

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  8. Agreed. I just worry that people will duck out before the meeting is over, or rush the prayer in the hurry to be home by whatever time they need to (me included; I have a school bus to meet on that day). I think the time to try is over the summer when people are less rushed, which would give us time to learn not to hurry the prayer.

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