Tuesday, July 1, 2014

Help for the Chanting-Impaired...

and a delight for the rest of us.  It's the Musical Breviary Blog! This is a wonerful project, all managed by one guy with a good voice. Subscribe to Musical Breviary, and any day you want to hear the day's office being chanted, the link (Morning and  Evening Prayer only) will appear in your mailbox.

From what I've sampled so far, bloggger/singer Theodore Forrence uses pretty simple chant tones, so it's easy to follow along once you've listened to a few verses. For copyright reasons, the version of the psalms used is a public domain version, but all the other texts  are straight out of the breviary. The hymns are the traditional Roman hymns--these are often one of the choices on ibreviary, and we are supposed to get these as the default hymns when the new English breviary comes out in....some years from now.

Check it out.

And welcome, new blog followers, Mark and  Tara.

3 comments:

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  2. The psalter version is that of the 1979 Book of Common Prayer of The Episcopal Church (in the USA). Also used by Anglicans in Canada and Scotland and by Lutherans and Presbyterians...AND by Anglican Use Ordinariate Roman Catholics. It's my favorite psalter. Back in the 1970s, the Episcopal Church also considered adopting the Grail Psalter but decided to form a committee to revise the Coverdale (traditional Anglican) psalter using basically the same vocabulary but in a more modern way. Poet W H Auden served on that committee for a time. I very much like the result. The (Roman Catholic) Benedictines in Newport, RI, use the 1973 version of the same psalter.

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  3. Quoting you: "we are supposed to get these as the default hymns when the new English breviary comes out in....some years from now." Waiting in joyful anticipation :)

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