Tuesday, November 4, 2014

Basilica Bewilderment




Okay. I just perused the General Instruction of the  Liturgy of the  Hours. I even got out my book just in case I knew something back when I wrote it that I'd since forgotten. I haven't found a thing.

So I'm willing to be vulnerable here! :) To show you that  I'm not quite the expert on the Liturgy of the Hours that people think I am. Here goes:

By what logic or church regulation does the feast of the Dedication of St. John Lateran Basilica (November 9th) take precedence over the 32nd Sunday in ordinary time???

It's a feast, not a solemnity.

The General Instruction does say that feasts of Our Lord (e.g. Transfiguration, Exaltation  of the Cross) falling on Sunday do take precedence over ordinary Sundays. But by what stretch can you say that the dedication of the Lateran basilica is a feast of Our Lord?

The Lateran is the Pope's diocesan cathedral,and just about the oldest church in  western  Christendom. Maybe that rates it a feast that usurps an ordinary Sunday. I just want to see where that is officially stated.

Maybe the writers of the General Instruction just plain forgot to say that the  Lateran feast also rated precedence over Sunday?

Lots of the readers here are very well informed about all things liturgical and historical. So if any of you have some light to shed on this, shed away!






10 comments:

  1. A feast that is given a specific date will replace a Sunday in Ordinary Time.

    http://youngfogeys.blogspot.com/2008/02/your-attention-please-there-has-been.html?m=1

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    1. Not quite. The feasts of the apostles are not celebrated if they occur on a Sunday, with the exception of Sts. Peter&Paul which is a solemnity. Nor the feast of the archangels. Nor feasts of Our Lady. Remember, I'm talking about a feast, not a solemnity.

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    2. Baptism of the Lord, Presentation of the Lord, Triumph of the Cross, All Souls, Dedication of St. John Lateran, and Holy Family are all feasts that occur on Sunday this year and were or will be celebrated but I'm stumped on the others like the feast of the Archangels which fell on a Sunday last year but were not celebrated.

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    3. This might explain why some feasts that fell on Sunday weren't celebrated: [GILH] 218. The celebrations of the saints are arranged so that they do not take precedence over those feast days and special seasons that commemorate the mysteries of salvation. [2] Nor are they allowed to break up the sequence of psalms and biblical readings or to give rise to undue repetitions.

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    4. More information here: http://forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?p=11979482

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  2. The Archbasilica was dedicated to "the most holy Savior" (Sanctissimi Salvatoris) by Pope Clement XII. By extension, therefore, the feast of its dedication is a feast of the Lord.

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    1. See? I knew some smart person would know something that made sense out of this.

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  3. You asked where this is found and the only written instance of this I can find comes from Pope Pius X's Divino Afflatu (Nov. 1911) a reform of the Breviary which raised the Feast of the Lateran Basilica to a Double First Class feast (along with the Feast of the Transfiguration) which placed it above Sundays which were considered simply "Doubles" at the time.

    http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/pius_x/apost_constitutions/documents/hf_p-x_apc_19111101_divino-afflatu_lt.html

    IX 3. Quum Sacrosancta Lateranensis Archibasilica omnium Ecclesiarum Urbis et Orbis sit mater et caput, tum ipsius Dedicationis Anniversarium, tum Festum Transfigurationis Domini, quod, praeter magnam Resurrectionis Dominicae sollemnitatem, tamquam Titulare ab ipsa recoli solet, ab universo Clero tam saeculari quam regulari, etiam ab illis qui peculiarem ritum sequuntur, sub ritu Duplici II classis deinceps celebrabitur.

    for more information on the ranking of liturgical days
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ranking_of_liturgical_days_in_the_Roman_Rite#cite_ref-11

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    1. Thanks for this, David. I know very little about the older system, other than a little "Short Breiviary" from the 50s that I use now and then. I also have a book on my Kindle by a Father Quigley, circa 1923, and someday plan to really delve into that. But it's interesting to see these connections between the old and the new.

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  4. St John Lateran, aka St John the Baptist, was the first public place of worship in the 4th century! Prior to this all worship was underground ad it was punishable by death. The irony of Johns beheading and what is going on in today's global atmosphere is incredible. This is the day we should pray for religious freedom throughout the world!

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