Wednesday, February 22, 2012

Ash Wednesday Welcome and Q&A



After Monday's shameless plea for more blogger "followers" my silly wish of breaking 100 has been achieved. But I understand that most of these new "followers"  have already been following for a while without having bothered to click follow and jump through whatever little hoops blogger presents. So thank you very much, Michele,JJ,KM, and Mahree.  Also to Chris, who signed up last week independent of the Shameless Plea. And now I will shut up about this followers thing.

Today is Q&A day. The breviary options are a bit tricky this week,because we leave off our normal place in the psalter, using either Wednesday IV for Office of Readings, Friday III for Morning Prayer,and then, I think, back to Wednesday IV for the other hours. So there's one question anticipated. Next question: what happens between Thursday and Saturday, psalter-wise?

Answer: week IV in the psalter up to the end of the last psalm, then flip to the Common of  Seasons in the front of your book for the everything else. We start over with Week I in the psalter on Sunday, and the four weeks cycle through as usual, although always using the Common of Season for the second half of each hour.

Anything else you want to know?



11 comments:

  1. I'm scratching my head over the Psalm for the Office of Readings on Saturday of the second week. In some of the books in the 4 volume set it is Psalm 106, but in the other books it becomes Psalm 136. Any idea why that is? Psalm 136 is used again at Monday evening of the 4th week, while Psalm 106 only has this one time slot, which makes me think it is the rightful occupant.

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  2. Wow, Russ, you almost had me stumped. I had never noticed the discrepancy before. I just pulled out all four volumes and checked. 106 is there in the Advent and Lent volumes, while 136 is in the two ordinary time volumes. I was about to agree with your theory of layout editors error. After all, both psalms begin with the same line, and both numbers end in "6". Perhaps easy for a tired layout person to not notice and put in the wrong psalm. But then I recalled that I have the Pauline one-volume breviary, which includes the psalter (not the readings) from the OOR. So I looked and sure enough, Saturday II has 106, with "Advent, Christmas, Lent,Easter" written above it. And then there's another section labelled "Ordinary Time" with Psalm 136 following. So there you are. One is for ordinary time, the other for the holy seasons.

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    1. Thank you for the detective work. My one volume version has Psalm 136 but no extra instructions. BTW that one is in Japanese -- I live in Tokyo. My 4 volume set is the English LOTH which I keep handy for the Office of Readings.

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    2. You pray in Japanese! Very cool.
      Tell me--does the Japanese breviary have those "psalm prayers" after each psalm? I've heard it said that these only appear in the American breviary, and I'm trying to verify that.
      Also-what does the title on the Japanese breviary say? Ours says Christian Prayer, the one from England says Divine Office. I'd like to collect the titles in other languages.

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    3. No, there are no Psalm prayers. The title is Kyoukai no Inori which is translated "Prayer of the Church"

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    4. Thanks. One more question. Is Kyoukai no Inori just the title on the breviary (like ours is Christian Prayer) or is it also the Japanese phrase for Liturgy of the Hours/Divine Office?

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    5. It is definitely the title of the book, and I haven't heard any other terms in reference to the practice. But I've never had a conversation about it. I'm a new Catholic, which might account for that, but I only know of one parish that even uses the breviary, and only for morning prayer. I've only seen it referred to as Kyoukai no Inori on the web, and I would speculate that it's the only term officially used in Japanese.

      You can see a photo of the book in an article on my web site:

      http://www.stutler.cc/russ/sing_psalms.html

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    6. I guess I should also mention how to pronounce it. "Kyoukai" rhymes with "Oh my" and is the word for church. "No" is pronounced the same as our "no" (our opposite of yes) and "Inori" is pronounced like ee-no-ree (although the r is closer to an l) and is the word for prayer. Hope I didn't make it even more confusing!

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    7. I just realized that the Japanese breviary has no hymns either. I didn't notice that until I happened to open my English one! At Morning prayer we sing hymns from the hymn book.

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  3. Being fairly new to DP I don't know how to work with the one antiphon given in the proper of seasons yet three psalms to pray ...
    JJ
    I also don't know how to post with my name at the top like everyone else does ? ? ?

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    1. Hi JJ, I assume you mean the one antiphon given for daytime prayer. What you do is say the antiphon before the first psalm (as usual)and then at the end of the third psalm. You may say the Glory Be after each psalm, OR you may choose to run all 3 psalms together and only do the glory be at the end of the third psalm. Often daytime prayer just takes one long psalm and breaks it into three parts (as you've probably noticed, so in these cases it can make lots of sense to just do it as one long psalm, with no glory be until the end.
      I hope that makes sense.
      As to posting with your name, I think you need a Google profile in order to do that.

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