Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Howdy Stranger + weekly Q&A

Welcome new blog follower Michael. This is the place to be for seekers, acolytes, and hardcore fans of the Liturgy of the Hours.

This post will be brief since I already wrote this morning about the fantastic reading by St. Pius X, which was all about our favorite subject.    But if you have questions about the hows, whys and wherefores of the breviary, then just fire away in the comment boxes.

5 comments:

  1. Contact us for more information at http://www.carrollsrs.com/ or 1-800-876-4569.
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  2. Perhaps I am the "new blog follower Michael" that Daria mentions in this post. Even if I'm not, it is so good to be connected to this blog for a number of reasons. Daria's book, The Everyday Catholic's Guide to the LOTH is a real blessing to the laity, helping make the LOTH a blessing to the entire Church. On a personal note, I have a number of major health issues, and praying the psalms on a daily basis using the LOTH is literally a life-line for me, connecting me to our loving God, as I weather the all too frequent emotional and physical storms. I know I'm not the only one out there who has medical issues, and prior to getting sick I spent many hours by the beds of very ill patients I was counseling. Thinking back, I know I missed many opportunities to help these individuals by not directing them to the psalms or giving them access to a psalter. A lonely, dark, scared night in a hospital bed is no where as lonely, dark, or scary with a breviary or psalter in hand. Yesterday's Office of Readings from St. Pius X reminded me why I returned to praying the Office and being supported by the psalms. Maybe all of us need to think about making a gift of the psalms to a friend or family member who is caught in a "storm." I haven't completely lost my sense of humor through all this ... maybe Daria needs to sell limited rights to her book to the Church for inclusion in laity bound breviaries. That way someone who has not spent time in seminary or in a monestary can actually make their way through the Office, and can be supported by the psalms.

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    1. Hi Michael,
      I got that from clicking on the newest picture on the members gallery on the right, so I don't it would be you, since you are signed on as Anonymous. But welcome, just the same, and thanks for your kind words! I'm so glad that the Office has been such a consolation to you. It certainly has been for me during a couple of hospitalizations long ago, so I know a little bit of what you are talking about. I'll add your health issues to my prayer intentions.
      That idea of binding my book into a layman's breviary is interesting, although it would bulk up the breviary way too much. But I certainly could do an abbreviated " quick start up guide" that would supply a need not met by the current instructions in the ordinary. I sent a note to my publisher to that effect, but don't hold your breath!

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  3. Hi,
    How/where can I find out about reciting the Response correctly in personal prayer. I suppose I can't reconcile the word "Responsory," with my idea of prayer prayed alone.
    Thanks, Parker

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    1. I covered this and a couple of other "praying alone" issues in my book. With the responsory after the reading, you are not responding to other people, but responding to the reading. Because you are by yourself, you wouldn't repeat the first line, e.g. this morning, Sept.3rd "Lord, listen to my cry, all my trust is in your promise" would only be said once.

      Similarly, with the intercessions, you would not use the response (e.g. "Keep us, Lord, on your path"), but just read through each petition, since you do not have to respond to yourself!

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