Friday, March 22, 2013

Fantastic article on Psalmody

...in this archived issue of Sacred Music. The link will take you to an 80 page pdf of the magazine, but I'm referring to the very first article which starts on page 7. The article was geared mostly towards religious, to encourage them to take the Liturgy of the Hours seriously, seeing it as one of their greatest and most fulfilling activities.   It's very inspirational. Then, the article goes on at length about choral chanting of the Hours. Even if you have no interest whatever in chanting your own psalter, understanding this "theology of chant" will enhance your understanding of the Liturgy of the Hours, and give you some thoughts that will help you to recite it with a more contemplative spirit. Give the article a try. Today's Friday, do it as extra spiritual reading.

10 comments:

  1. Thank you for posting this link. This is so timely, as I just received a second-hand copy of the Mundelein Psalter! Maybe my prayer life is hitting a new note?

    Many thanks again!

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    1. I love, love, love my Mundelein Psalter. Sad, though, I've had too much sinus congestion this past three weeks to chant.

      Mudelein has by far the easiest tones to learn, plus they have their wonderful support site with audio files of everything, so you don't even have to read music very well.

      Best wishes with the adventure of learning to chant.

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    2. Daria, can you check the audio file links for the Mundelein? I bought their psalter book after reading about it in your wonderful new book. I love their psalter, but I have tried to go to the audio links and get error messages every time. All other pages of thier website work fine, just the audio pages don't open for me.

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    3. Oh my goodness! I just checked you are right. I'd last gone to that site in January to learn some hymns and it worked fine then. I will try to contact the author and see what it going on.

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    4. Thank you for checking on this. I can read music but hearing the notes is best!

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  2. Footnote no. 5, p.9, practically condemns the sets published by the Catholic Book Publishing Company. Whoa!

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    1. Well, it's a just criticism. CBPC just assumed that most of us would just want to recite and alternate by strophe instead of by verse. Pretty presumptuous of them. Perhaps putting in asterisks and daggers is a big typesetting headache, which might have helped them make this decision. To be fair, the Pauline breviary did the same thing. Let's hope for better things in the future. At least we can get these markings with the Mundelein and with some of the online breviares.

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  3. Speaking of asterisks and daggers, ebreviary.com will make available, for free, in pdf forms and other online displays the entire Liturgy of The Hours starting tomorrow all the way through April 8. Send them a note of thanks.

    http://ebreviary.com/ebreviary/usa2/ebusassfprayer4c.nsf!OpenDatabase

    (or see http://ebreviary.com/)

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  4. Thank you for the link. I did not know that pauses were called for in the psalms with the LOTH. I also found the info about the Mundelein Psalter interesting. I had heard of it but was unsure as to what it was. I can't read music and I don't sing well, but I might consider getting the book provided they are going to fix the links to the audio, as that will be the only way I would be able to learn the proper chant tones.

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    1. I just wish I had the tech savvy to make and post recording--I'd record the tones with my own voice and post them here. But I have no clue how this might be done.

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